Mark Indig - OHI:YO´
       
     
Mark Indig - OHI:YO´
       
     
Mark Indig - OHI:YO´

Mark Indig ‘s OHI:YO´ is a series of powerful and timely photos documenting a very unique portion of the country. The Iroquois called it Ohi:yó meaning “Good River.” The French called it “La Belle Riviere.” It has become something considerably less and much more. The Ohio River begins at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers in Pittsburgh and ends as it joins the Mississippi near Cairo, Illinois. The 981-mile river flows through or along the border of six states, and its drainage basin includes parts of 14 states. Running east-west through much of its length, it knits together the cultures of the East, Appalachia, the South and the Midwest; its direction and orientation like the distortions of a quavering arrow in flight, pointed right at the heart of America. The Mississippi is longer and more famous, but it can be argued that the Ohio has been equally important in the history, development, economy and politics of America. In that way, it is most reminiscent of the great rivers of Europe, like the Danube. And it can be spectacularly beautiful; or not. In this most contentious of political seasons, the current state of life along the Ohio River is a window on the anger and dysfunction in our system, but also on the compelling pull of small town life.

April 29 - June 2, 2017